Aurora Borealis | Northern Lights

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The aurora can be seen anywhere in Scotland when the right conditions are met and where light pollution is at a minimum. You are more likely to see the northern lights in Scotland between August and May. The reason is that you can better distinguish the colours of the aurora when the night sky is dark.

In Scotland, the Northern Lights are also called “The Mirrie Dancers”

In order to see the Northern Lights, you need a dark, clear night, as well as great space weather. Also, there are Aurora forecast apps that will predict the Aurora and these are worth downloading to a smartphone.  

You have to put real effort into seeing the Northern Lights

Go out after dark & recce the dark sky – looking for areas with zero light pollution from the moon & street lights. Check Aurora, Moon & Cloud forecast apps and set alarm clocks for peak viewing hours. “As much as my other half dislikes being dragged out of our toasty warm bed, stepping into the shocking blasts of cold North Sea air eventually pay off”.  Remember…You have to “earn” a good photo

Northern Lights Boyne 17 April 21 2359
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Northern lights with Pillars over Moray Firth
Spectacular view of the Aurora Borealis in Sandend village

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Can you see the Northern Lights with the naked eye?

The real question is, do the northern lights produce enough light for you to pick up the colours? YES, but not always… In addition, many auroras are totally invisible to the naked eye and can only be seen by looking at them indirectly, i.e, out of the corner of your eye, OR, by using your Smartphone or Camera.  Lights appear in a spectrum of colours including grey/white. 

The aurora can look like a wispy grey/white cloud making it easy to miss. Is it a cloud or sky? Cloud or Aurora – look for stars behind the’white stuff’ – if you can see em’ you are seeing the Aurora!

Northern lights with Pillars over Moray Firth

Visit Glendale Aurora for the link to the App.

Visit Clear Outside for the link to the App.

More To Explore...

Gannet colony at troup head is one of the biggest colonies in the UK. They are distinctively shaped with a long neck and long pointed beak. Often travelling in small groups they feed by flying high before plunging into the sea to catch fish.

RSPB Troup Head

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland’s largest mainland gannet colony.

The high cliffs of Troup Head provide a spectacular setting for Scotland’s largest mainland gannet colony. There are also thousands of kittiwakes, guillemots and razorbills here, along with several other species, including puffins.

Photography

As voted by National Geographic Top Rated Places to Visit – “A wonderful region of Scotland. Beaches are fantastic, and the area welcomes visitors as one of their own. Largely rural. People work together for the greater good–fishermen tolerate canoeists; farmers allow walkers to pass over their land on footpaths, etc.”

Cycling through forest

Cycling

There are exciting cycling routes east, west and south of Sandend Holidays.

Cycling is a very popular activity in Aberdeenshire and Morayshire.

The location allows for a range of riding, from leisurely family saunders to adrenalin-fuelled downhill MTB routes.

The area is also popular for road rides and long-distance cycle touring

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